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I havent watched the videos yet. I'll go back and check them out when I can.

I read a book about a decade a go from Charlotte Iserbyt called The Deliberate Dumbing Down of America. It's really long but very enlightening.

I don't have a solution, but my economics background tells me that a monopolistic public education system limits affordable options, and discourages any chance of the schools being creative with new solutions for improvements. This why I like the idea of a voucher system, at least as a temporary measure until the big problems can get fixed.

A few thoughts:
I'm in favor of financially rewarding good teachers. But it looks as though they are buried in red tape by overpaid administrators who seem to think that their job is to keep everything the same while always screaming for more money to fix problems.

Separate kids by abilities and their desire to learn. I see curriculum homogenized for "C" level teaching where the old "C" is now the "A". This limits the brightest kids while also rewarding the kids who don't care or are just plain below average by nature. Troublemakers disrupt the class and hur everyone, but the culture of inclusivity says that these kids have a right to be with the others. No they don't.

Barriers to entry for teaching are too high. I considered teaching as an option for partial retirement but another 4 years of studying child psychology and policy is a joke, so I could never be a full staff teacher. I remember in college that the 3 best teachers I ever had were "Lecturers" with no teaching degree but had had several years experience in running businesses or writing code for Apple. These people taught the real world , not the theory BS that doesn't apply 99% of the time.
Then there's the pay issue. Why would I want to be a teacher for 1/3 the salary of an engineering job I currently have? I wouldn't expect that pay gap to be equal, but being payed based on experience should be considered as a valid substitute for a teaching degree.

Based on my own educational journey as well as parent teacher conferences with my own kids, I'd say that there are maybe 5% of the teachers that are truly exceptional. These people treat the job almost like a zealous religious calling despite meager pay. The rest either have no business teaching, or do just the bare minimum. It's just a job. I've also noticed that many of these teachers are so mentally isolated that they could never hold a job in a competitive market. Teaching creates this safe space bubble for a lot of these people.

I also like the idea of abolishing any type of federal education system. The states could do a better job with less red tape. Solutions could be implemented on a local level where they best fit the needs of the community. A one size fits none solution just doesn't work.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
I havent watched the videos yet. I'll go back and check them out when I can.

I read a book about a decade a go from Charlotte Iserbyt called The Deliberate Dumbing Down of America. It's really long but very enlightening.

I don't have a solution, but my economics background tells me that a monopolistic public education system limits affordable options, and discourages any chance of the schools being creative with new solutions for improvements. This why I like the idea of a voucher system, at least as a temporary measure until the big problems can get fixed.

A few thoughts:
I'm in favor of financially rewarding good teachers. But it looks as though they are buried in red tape by overpaid administrators who seem to think that their job is to keep everything the same while always screaming for more money to fix problems.

Separate kids by abilities and their desire to learn. I see curriculum homogenized for "C" level teaching where the old "C" is now the "A". This limits the brightest kids while also rewarding the kids who don't care or are just plain below average by nature. Troublemakers disrupt the class and hur everyone, but the culture of inclusivity says that these kids have a right to be with the others. No they don't.

Barriers to entry for teaching are too high. I considered teaching as an option for partial retirement but another 4 years of studying child psychology and policy is a joke, so I could never be a full staff teacher. I remember in college that the 3 best teachers I ever had were "Lecturers" with no teaching degree but had had several years experience in running businesses or writing code for Apple. These people taught the real world , not the theory BS that doesn't apply 99% of the time.
Then there's the pay issue. Why would I want to be a teacher for 1/3 the salary of an engineering job I currently have? I wouldn't expect that pay gap to be equal, but being payed based on experience should be considered as a valid substitute for a teaching degree.

Based on my own educational journey as well as parent teacher conferences with my own kids, I'd say that there are maybe 5% of the teachers that are truly exceptional. These people treat the job almost like a zealous religious calling despite meager pay. The rest either have no business teaching, or do just the bare minimum. It's just a job. I've also noticed that many of these teachers are so mentally isolated that they could never hold a job in a competitive market. Teaching creates this safe space bubble for a lot of these people.

I also like the idea of abolishing any type of federal education system. The states could do a better job with less red tape. Solutions could be implemented on a local level where they best fit the needs of the community. A one size fits none solution just doesn't work.
More great stuff! ^^^^^



I don't seem to recall ever having heard of Charlotte Iserbyt; so, thank you very much for the tip; I've got some catching up to do!

For anyone who might be interested, here's her website:
Deliberate Dumbing Down | Official Website of Charlotte Thomson Iserbyt

...and here's where one can download her book ("The Deliberate Dumbing Down of America: A Chronological Paper Trail (1999-09-01) by Charlotte Thomson Iserbyt" "This is the original, 743-page book that tells the who, what, and when of the takeover of the US educational system.") for free:
https://archive.org/details/DeliberateDumbingDownOfAmericaCharlotteIserbyt

...and here's the first in a video series from her self-titled TouTube channel:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BD_Yds81n2w&t=51s
 
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