DiyMobileAudio.com Car Stereo Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The HD1200 has 2 sets of speaker outputs. I have 2 DVC 4 ohm subs. Should I use both sets of outputs - 1 for each sub - or use one set and wire the subs with voice coils wired in series, speakers wired in parallel?

Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,054 Posts
those outputs are there for your convience. internally they are shorted together. so wire your subs any way that it easiest.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
those outputs are there for your convience. internally they are shorted together. so wire your subs any way that it easiest.
Thanks. So there is absolutely no difference SQ-wise if I use both speaker outputs or only one. Correct?

If I use both speaker outputs and wire each sub in parallel for a 2 ohm load, do I add the 2 2 ohm loads to end up with a total 4 ohm load on the amp?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,054 Posts
they are shorted together 1/2" inside the amplifier. makes no difference if you connect both subs to one connector or use two. I would use two just because it is easier
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
they are shorted together 1/2" inside the amplifier. makes no difference if you connect both subs to one connector or use two. I would use two just because it is easier
$hit - I edited my earlier question when you were answering it. Can you answer my edited question please?

Many thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,054 Posts
If I use both speaker outputs and wire each sub in parallel for a 2 ohm load, do I add the 2 2 ohm loads to end up with a total 4 ohm load on the amp?
if you wire each sub in parallel to 2 ohms and then wire it to each of the amplifier's connectors, that would be 1 ohm.

what ohm stable is the amplifier?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
if you wire each sub in parallel to 2 ohms and then wire it to each of the amplifier's connectors, that would be 1 ohm.

what ohm stable is the amplifier?
HD1200. Not stable at 1 ohm.

Let me try again. If I wire each sub in series at 8 ohms and then wire each of them to each of the amp's speaker outputs, then that would be a total load 4ohms on the amp?

Thanks again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,054 Posts
yes, you can wire each speaker in series and then connect them to the amplifier's connectors OR you can wire the speakers parallel and then wire both subs in series to the amplifier. both ways will give you 4 ohms.

first way is a little easier to wire and there are benefits to series wired voice coils.

good article, if you want to know more

Subwoofer Wiring Diagrams Understand Ohms Law
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
yes, you can wire each speaker in series and then connect them to the amplifier's connectors OR you can wire the speakers parallel and then wire both subs in series to the amplifier. both ways will give you 4 ohms.

first way is a little easier to wire and there are benefits to series wired voice coils.

good article, if you want to know more

Subwoofer Wiring Diagrams Understand Ohms Law
Thanks. To me Ohms Law is counter intuitive. I will read the article this evening.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,054 Posts
lol, if you know a little about algebra it is easy.
V = I R
P = I V

P = power
V= volts
I = current
R = resistance.

if you know 2 of them, you can work out the other, just like algebra.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
lol, if you know a little about algebra it is easy.
V = I R
P = I V

P = power
V= volts
I = current
R = resistance.

if you know 2 of them, you can work out the other, just like algebra.
I read the article but it doesn't explain how you calculate total ohms for 2 subs each having their own output from the sub amp. I know how to wire 2 subs using 1 output. I'm still not sure about 2 outputs. I still can't see how 2-8 ohm loads equals 1-4 ohm load. That does not make sense to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,054 Posts
1 / (1 / R1 + 1 / R2) is the formula for resistance


so:

1 / (1 / 8 + 1 / 8)

1 / (1 / 4)

or 4

that formula can be used for any number.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top