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Everyone says make sure they instill is good. But what is a good instill? What are the thing you need to keep a eye out for when you get something installed. Now days I think is plug and play so how hard would it be to instill a audio system.
 

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With a good install, there are a few things that need to be considered.

1. A good install will be done to a standard that the fabrication won't fail before the rest of the car. Wires should be run properly, through grommets, care needs to be taken so that they can't rub and short out over time, terminations need to be done properly so you don't have to pull anything apart looking for a loose wire.

2. Speakers need to be mounted to solid baffles. You need a solid baffle to prevent resonance from taking output from the speaker, and creating distortion. Material choice needs to be considered. MDF is cheap and easy to work with, but also does poorly when exposed to moisture, if it is to be used in a car door, or in a humid region, you are going to want to seal the MDF before installing. HDPE is a good alternative material for a speaker baffle.

3. Sound deadening is important. Panels resonate which colors the sound. A little vibration dampener goes a long way to keep buzzing, resonating panels quiet. You can dive in and do full sound deadening with MLV, but paying careful attention to large flexible panels, and applying vibration dampener is a very important part of a good install. Additionally, any wiring that is added, or hasn't been secured by the factory should be addressed, it can rattle and tap against panels. Taking care of things like wires, and rattling panel clips should be done before reassembly. Also be careful to reassemble things correctly, and use new clips if you break some in the disassembly process.

4. Speaker location and axis need to be considered. In a good 3-way front stage it's possible to keep the speakers playing below their beaming point, so axis isn't important, but the position relative to reflective surfaces is. If custom work is being done, a speaker's proximity to these surfaces need to be considered. Ideally, one should test a few locations, unless of course they are keeping things stealth and using OEM locations. If speakers cannot be kept below beaming, then their axis comes into play. It's important to know that a speaker's on, and off axis response when selecting your crossover point. For example: the "fullrange" wideband speakers that some people like to use can really only be used without a tweeter if they are pointed directly on axis. The larger diameter means that high frequencies will suffer everywhere except for directly on axis. Knowing your speaker's strenghts and weaknesses prior to installation will help a lot.

These are the main things that pop into my head. I'm sure others will offer up some things to consider that I missed.
 

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Those are examples of things that I think a novice, or a bad shop would pay little attention to. In order for the install to be done right, you need an installer who will value these areas because these things can have a big impact on the sound quality, and reliability of the stereo system.
 
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