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Discussion Starter #22
It's been a few years since I've redone my substage and these new generations of subs, along with several free box design programs have way better performance that wasn't available several years ago. I've been having Mobile Enclosures design my last few boxes (last was 2010). He has me fill out a form that has all the speaker specs, the cu. ft. of the trunk/cabin, distance to the drivers seat & windshield and several more details when he does the box design. I'm sure these questions have been asked repeatedly:
Is it necessary to have my box professionally designed these days or do you guys recommend me doing it all myself?

Second question is If I DIY it, what software do you recommend?

Third question is the type of port slot, aero, labyrinth, ect... My goal is to hit the low low (30hz and below) bass as loud as possible so tuning will be in the 28-32hz range.
 

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You do not need to have a box professionally designed, if you have some wood working tools. The hardest part about designing a box is not getting the volume or port correct, it's getting it to fit in the car the way you want. This part will be much easier for someone who has access to the car to take all of the measurements necessary, and who can double check things to avoid missing a detail.

Sealed boxes are easy, you just need to figure out the volume. Ported a tad more complex because you need to figure out the volume of the enclosure, as well as the port tuning. It's all very doable for a DIY kind of person with access to some tools to cut the pieces, and assemble them.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
You do not need to have a box professionally designed, if you have some wood working tools. The hardest part about designing a box is not getting the volume or port correct, it's getting it to fit in the car the way you want. This part will be much easier for someone who has access to the car to take all of the measurements necessary, and who can double check things to avoid missing a detail.

Sealed boxes are easy, you just need to figure out the volume. Ported a tad more complex because you need to figure out the volume of the enclosure, as well as the port tuning. It's all very doable for a DIY kind of person with access to some tools to cut the pieces, and assemble them.
I got the tools and the skills and have built almost all of my boxes in the past, I've just had someone else do the design for like $50-$60. Do you have a preferred software or website for me to figure out the ideal port size/length/type? If I go with an Aero style port I will have a little more room for tuning so I'm kind of leaning that way but still undecided.
 

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I got the tools and the skills and have built almost all of my boxes in the past, I've just had someone else do the design for like $50-$60. Do you have a preferred software or website for me to figure out the ideal port size/length/type? If I go with an Aero style port I will have a little more room for tuning so I'm kind of leaning that way but still undecided.
I use WinISD. Once you enter the TS parameters, and select your enclosure volume, you can adjust the tuning frequency and port diameter to see what length is needed.
 

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Ports are, for lack of better terms, universal... to an extent.

Slot ports are a little more susceptible to port noise and “chuffing,” but are an easy way to add stability/ rigidity to the overall enclosure and are easily modified.

Aero ports can’t be easily modified, but offer a smoother response, but they can easily allow for over excursion.

Port Tubes, like aero, can’t be easily modified, or tuned, and can be difficult to attach to the enclosure, plan for additional structural support which will decrease overall end net volume.

I’m sure there’s more differences, but it’s Sunday, and my brains took the day off.


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As I posted recently in another thread, if the subs are facing up, some of the bass goes toward the front of the car and some goes to the back. These waves then reflect and come back towards each other. Whether they are in phase or not depends on freq, size of the vehicle, shape of the reflection surface, etc. Often they will not be in phase and your bass will not be as loud or tight as it should be.

Putting the sub against the rear seat facing toward the back of the car means that most of the bass reflects off the hatch and goes forward. This minimizes phase issues and should improve bass response.
 

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Just out of curiosity I’ve been looking at a design I came across that looks like a combination of a dual folded horn and a 4th order band pass, (I could be wrong on guessing the combination of designs.) when I first got the subs, (back in 2006 lol) I had them in a sealed enclosure, then moved to ported, and both performed quite well. I think the Type-R’s will excel in the design, it’s just a matter of getting all the measurements right before I commit.


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On this design are the subs in a sealed section feeding a line? Years ago a guy passed on a design that he called a bandpass t line for a DD 1508. It was basically the driver in a sealed box feeding a tuned t line. I never built it, but I heard it sound incredible in a hatch of an SUV. At the time, I had a pathfinder but now have sedans
 
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