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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys, I need to make this bracket sit flush into the wood here. What kind of tool or bit or attachment can grind the wood down other than just a file and a lot of sweat?
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If I don't make it flush, there will be a lump when I put the carpet over it.
 

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I think before I'd remove any material to allow the bracket to be flush, maybe double the amp board and remove material from it. Your board will be very thin and weak if you remove enough material to make the bracket flush with only one layer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think before I'd remove any material to allow the bracket to be flush, maybe double the amp board and remove material from it. Your board will be very thin and weak if you remove enough material to make the bracket flush with only one layer.
Yeah maaaaybe. I'm just reluctant to lose another 1/4" or something of trunk space and feel like it'll be more work to apply another layer than to just get this little bit grinded out.

Is strength really a concern? I know there'll be a lot of bass from a 12" sub, but is it really a concern that the board could beak over time?
 

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Assuming you used 1/4" because that's how much trunk space you'd lose... I suspect with only 1/8" of mdf being there at that attachment point, I suspect your "over time" comment is generous. It'll probably break almost immediately.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Assuming you used 1/4" because that's how much trunk space you'd lose... I suspect with only 1/8" of mdf being there at that attachment point, I suspect your "over time" comment is generous. It'll probably break almost immediately.
There must be some confusion about my application. I've hauled this thing in and out of the car like 20 times trying to shave the wood and get it to sit perfect with a bubble level. It's not going to break unless I gain some weight and then accidentally sit on it.

Just hoping someone has an idea of a quick and cheap way to get a channel grinded into this wood. I have a cheapie router but not a router table.

Is there a router bit out there that I could use for this without a table? The problem with shopping for router bits is, they usually just show you the bit on the product page and don't show you what the bit does. You kind of have to use your imagination or something.
 

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That material looks pretty thin to begin with but if you good with a chisel maybe it’s possible or since you already own a router you can look into mortising it but either way I don’t see it being very sturdy after your done.
 

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A simple low-tech solution would be to repeatedly run a sharp box cutter (or the like) around the bracket, where it meets the panel, to a depth equal to the thickness of the bracket, then carve out the material with a wood chisel or the like (similar to the relief for a door hinge).
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That material looks pretty thin to begin with but if you good with a chisel maybe it’s possible or since you already own a router you can look into mortising it but either way I don’t see it being very sturdy after your done.
Naah it'll be fine. I've already man-handled this thing with both amps mounted to it many times. Not worried.

Guess I'll give this a shot:
 

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Naah it'll be fine. I've already man-handled this thing with both amps mounted to it many times. Not worried.

Guess I'll give this a shot:
You realize you can't use that with a drill.
If you know how to use a router then why not just use that?
I'm confused about what you are asking.
What would be an easier solution other than the router?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You realize you can't use that with a drill.
If you know how to use a router then why not just use that?
I'm confused about what you are asking.
What would be an easier solution other than the router?
No you're right. The solution to this issue a router. I bought that bit and will use it with my cheapie hand-held router.

I've just had so little experience using my router that it didn't dawn on me that a router with some kind of bit is definitely the way to go here. I just thought maybe there was something else out there that I hadn't seen before.

But nope, this job needs a router and a bit I've never seen before until today.

Anyway, thanks for helping me get this one sorted guys.
 

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No you're right. The solution to this issue a router. I bought that bit and will use it with my cheapie hand-held router.

I've just had so little experience using my router that it didn't dawn on me that a router with some kind of bit is definitely the way to go here. I just thought maybe there was something else out there that I hadn't seen before.

But nope, this job needs a router and a bit I've never seen before until today.

Anyway, thanks for helping me get this one sorted guys.
I would practice on some scrap first to get a feel
For it.
 
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You need to make a template first with that bit.
 

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Trace the outline of that bracket then clamp a straight edge to the work piece that is offset enough to account for your router base. Run the router along the straight edge and stop when you've traveled as far as you need. Move the straight edge over and repeat until you've removed enough material. You can always clamp a second straight edge or piece of material to act as a stop so you don't travel too far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Trace the outline of that bracket then clamp a straight edge to the work piece that is offset enough to account for your router base. Run the router along the straight edge and stop when you've traveled as far as you need. Move the straight edge over and repeat until you've removed enough material. You can always clamp a second straight edge or piece of material to act as a stop so you don't travel too far.
Right on I'll do that. Thanks for the guidance.
 

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No you're right. The solution to this issue a router. I bought that bit and will use it with my cheapie hand-held router.

I've just had so little experience using my router that it didn't dawn on me that a router with some kind of bit is definitely the way to go here. I just thought maybe there was something else out there that I hadn't seen before.

But nope, this job needs a router and a bit I've never seen before until today.

Anyway, thanks for helping me get this one sorted guys.
Oh OK...I get it now.
So the easiest way..not the cleanest or most accurate but I don't think anyone is gonna be looking at the piece where you are working on it right now.
Givin that assumption is correct I would trace the outline of the bracket and follow the lines. About 1/16 of an inch at a time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Oh OK...I get it now.
So the easiest way..not the cleanest or most accurate but I don't think anyone is gonna be looking at the piece where you are working on it right now.
Givin that assumption is correct I would trace the outline of the bracket and follow the lines. About 1/16 of an inch at a time.
Yeah that's pretty much it. And the thing about carpet is, as long as there are surrounding areas that are level and with adequate surface area, little screwups like divets and other inconsistencies in the surface are invisible unless you really work hard to press in on them while the glue is drying after laying on the carpet.

So, I'd have to do a really terrible job with the router for this bit of work to be visible at all once the carpet is on.
 

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Yeah that's pretty much it. And the thing about carpet is, as long as there are surrounding areas that are level and with adequate surface area, little screwups like divets and other inconsistencies in the surface are invisible unless you really work hard to press in on them while the glue is drying after laying on the carpet.

So, I'd have to do a really terrible job with the router for this bit of work to be visible at all once the carpet is on.
That's what I was thinking this whole time. Glad you worked it man.
 

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Maybe I’m missing the bigger picture of the install, but I’d just bend the middle of the bracket, so you can mount it on the rear of the panel.
 
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Maybe I’m missing the bigger picture of the install, but I’d just bend the middle of the bracket, so you can mount it on the rear of the panel.
I can mount it on the rear, but it would still require that I get it flush into the wood because the rear of the panel sits into the trunk in a certain way. You can see on the back I've routered it around that curve with a 45 degree angle bit.

I'll show the final result when this is done. It should be pretty nice for DIY and noob level experience.
 
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