DiyMobileAudio.com Car Stereo Forum banner

281 - 283 of 283 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
There is a REALLY robust finding called the "Ikea effect" where the amount of struggle and personal effort you put into something greatly alters your perceived value of it. In the standard model there are two conditions: one where participants are given a crappy piece of furniture already assembled and a second where participants are given the components of the same piece and asked to construct it. In both cases participants are asked to place a dollar value on the chair for resale. Participants who do not build the piece give it a realistic value, typically just a couple of dollars. With overwhelming reliability participants who construct the furniture will place a high dollar value on their crappy pieces asking for 15 or 20 dollars.
There's also studies that show the more money people spend on something, the more they perceive it to be ideal - essentially making anecdotal fallacy stronger. People expect that the more they spend, the better something must be - but like with SPL subwoofers, that's simply not always true. Especially when specific goals are introduced - or disregarded. You pay more for "niche", and if you are a SQ guy who pays $1000 bucks for an SPL amplifier - you'll be disappointed. If you are an average Joe who spends $2000 on Focal Utopias, and just swaps the factory speakers for them - they won't be close to reaching $2000 worth of potential (or even $200 worth of equivalent). But Average Joe doesn't know that, assumes since he's spent the money - that's as good as it could possibly get. And since Joe only has his anecdotal experience, combined with his limited understanding, Average Joe turns into the guy you see on EVERY forum, countering every caution and criticism with "You know what man? I don't care what you say about [sealing your doors/acoustic treatments/placement/aiming/EQ/etc]... I like how it sounds, and that's all that matters!"
It's an artificial argument ender because
a) to this guy, sure, fine whatever. He's right, what matters is he's satisfied with his $2000 purchase.
b) to everyone else reading on the forum, it's a fallacy - he could have been just as satisfied or more with a $100 set of speakers and $100 more spent on even minor door treatments. From a form perspective, it doesn't help the forum reader, reading the member's perception is artificially higher than it should be. In my experience you can identify that guy by their lack of ability to discuss at a technical level. This is the person who just says things like "I love my Focal speakers", and can't convey why beyond "they just sounded best to me".

And there's definitely also a personality type - the person who doesn't want to talk about the result of what they got, they want to show off what they spent. They will actively say "that cost me _". The result isn't what they care about, just conspicuous consumption. Their "high" or "stoke" doesn't come from that feeling of getting a better result, it comes from a feeling of "I afforded this, and other people can't".

I hate to say it, but whenever I encounter those types of people - the "I swear to god these things I own are awesome", and the "I spent more than you, so I"m better than you" personality types - I completely disregard (if I even read on) what they are saying.

And you know what - there's a lot of them. It's unfortunate, because they make up a lot of the "people who spend more" demographic - people who have more money than knowledge, vs. people who have enough knowledge to know they need to spend more here and there, and therefore made the choices they did. The former are many, the latter are few - but are the valuable ones. So it's important to be able to differentiate them. SO important, IMO. :geek:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
641 Posts
There's also studies that show the more money people spend on something, the more they perceive it to be ideal - essentially making anecdotal fallacy stronger. People expect that the more they spend, the better something must be - but like with SPL subwoofers, that's simply not always true. Especially when specific goals are introduced - or disregarded. You pay more for "niche", and if you are a SQ guy who pays $1000 bucks for an SPL amplifier - you'll be disappointed. If you are an average Joe who spends $2000 on Focal Utopias, and just swaps the factory speakers for them - they won't be close to reaching $2000 worth of potential (or even $200 worth of equivalent). But Average Joe doesn't know that, assumes since he's spent the money - that's as good as it could possibly get. And since Joe only has his anecdotal experience, combined with his limited understanding, Average Joe turns into the guy you see on EVERY forum, countering every caution and criticism with "You know what man? I don't care what you say about [sealing your doors/acoustic treatments/placement/aiming/EQ/etc]... I like how it sounds, and that's all that matters!"
It's an artificial argument ender because
a) to this guy, sure, fine whatever. He's right, what matters is he's satisfied with his $2000 purchase.
b) to everyone else reading on the forum, it's a fallacy - he could have been just as satisfied or more with a $100 set of speakers and $100 more spent on even minor door treatments. From a form perspective, it doesn't help the forum reader, reading the member's perception is artificially higher than it should be. In my experience you can identify that guy by their lack of ability to discuss at a technical level. This is the person who just says things like "I love my Focal speakers", and can't convey why beyond "they just sounded best to me".

And there's definitely also a personality type - the person who doesn't want to talk about the result of what they got, they want to show off what they spent. They will actively say "that cost me _". The result isn't what they care about, just conspicuous consumption. Their "high" or "stoke" doesn't come from that feeling of getting a better result, it comes from a feeling of "I afforded this, and other people can't".

I hate to say it, but whenever I encounter those types of people - the "I swear to god these things I own are awesome", and the "I spent more than you, so I"m better than you" personality types - I completely disregard (if I even read on) what they are saying.

And you know what - there's a lot of them. It's unfortunate, because they make up a lot of the "people who spend more" demographic - people who have more money than knowledge, vs. people who have enough knowledge to know they need to spend more here and there, and therefore made the choices they did. The former are many, the latter are few - but are the valuable ones. So it's important to be able to differentiate them. SO important, IMO. :geek:
Buyers remorse and embarrasment are issues. And sheer pig headed denial 😄
.
Self reflection and the ability to admit you are wrong are great characteristics to have.

Bragging about how much money you have and what you can afford go deeply to some people's personal image of who they are. Which is a bit sad. Better to brag about how philanthropic you are. That's still a bit needy but at least they are making a difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
DSP processor is to promote a set of the ordinary audio system to a very high level of sound quality performance but to achieve a high level of sound quality performance, not only need a good product but also need a powerful tuner.

When choosing to buy a DSP, priority should be given to meeting these three points:

① The more functions of DSP, the better, the more functions, the tuner will not be limited by the function when tuning, and it is difficult to improve the sound quality to a higher level. It's like a chef needs a full range of ingredients to make a dish more delicious.
271457


② The finer the adjustment, the better. For the tuner, the finer the DSP, the better the tuning.

③Expansibility and compatibility. Expansibility is to reserve space for future upgrades. Compatibility needs to consider whether the DSP is compatible with the original car system, human-machine interface, buttons, etc. Generally, choose a DSP with greater compatibility.

At the same time, when purchasing DSP, objectively, it also depends on the comparison of data, such as technical aspects, parts, etc. To sum up in one sentence: No matter how good the data is displayed, it does not mean that the sound quality is improved better, and the sound quality is improved. The display on the data is not bad.

Only with the above points can a qualified DSP be counted, and each frequency band of the sound can be corrected in the car, so as to maximize the user experience.
 
281 - 283 of 283 Posts
Top