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Discussion Starter #1
hey there guys.

i am looking for ways of bonding, filling, and finishing plastic stuff.

i have a few things that i have done - and i want to expierement with ways to test these things against each other to determine the best tools and techniques and maybe put together a little tech log about what i have tried, and how they work out.

so im looking to you guys to give me some feedback on products that you have tried, or that you would recommend.

right now i have these on order or on hand;

heat gun tip for plastic welding
acetone + ABS for filler\welding
soldering iron + abs for welding
ABS\PVC glue for working with PVC\plastic pipes
cyanoacrylate+catalyst glue


i am thinking of picking up some glues and epoxies to kind of compare between everything to see what works best and what does not work so well.

if anyone can offer any suggestions as things i do not already have, or what i should try, please post them here.


as far as the actual test is concerned, i was thinking of trying to do a stress-test with ABS sheets... cutting them into strips 1 inch by a few inches, and adhering a 1x1 inch square to a second strip, following the instructions of whatever technique\product i am testing, and then trying to tear them apart. i am not sure what kind of rig i can use as a insturment to test for shear strength yet - but ill figure it out when i get there.

also i was thinking of trying to 'fill' a gap and sand it back smooth and see how well it works.

just things that everyone here might find useful when working on our own cars while i am working on my own :)

thanks!
-andy
 

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Oh definitely following this thread. Been thinking of ways to make custom food and water bowls for my dog in the truck.
As well as housing pods for led lighting

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Xparent Green Tapatalk 2
 

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How about this?

Ultrasonic welding - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

:D

Don't know if there's a way to do this in the "mobile" world... but iirc it's one of the best ways to join plastics...

Maybe some supertweeters on each side of the material, play some Ultrasonic tones and voila! ( JK :D )
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
that is good thinking - ultrasonic welding is a form of friction welding, and that is basically heat welding. the cool thing about ultrasonic, is the two pieces are the 'speakers' being induced to vibrate by the device. its how they seal toothpaste tubes, poptart wrappers, toy whistles and such. but the equipment is quite spendy and specific to the work piece... so i dont know if that would be practical to test for car fabrication purposes...

https://www.google.com/search?q=ultrasonic+plastic+welding+tool&safe=off&rls=com.microsoft:en-us:IE-SearchBox&prmd=ivns&source=lnms&sa=X&ei=lNpfU8HLLOTYyAGG4ICQBg&ved=0CAQQ_AU

looks like the hand held types can be hundreds of dollars - im trying to find inexpensive and practical means of fusing plastic pieces to fabricate dash panels, a pillar pods, and the like :)
 

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I'm no expert with plastics, but I've been working with 1/8" ABS sheets a bit the past few months. I built my center channel enclosure from 1/8" ABS. The baffle is 2 layers laminated. I bond the parts together permanently with IC-2000 rubber toughened black CA, and I use an accelerator spray. I buy these from Metra.
 

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Some info I found a while back that was useful for me when I was making some custom dash kits.
A "Y" indicates that the solvent will dissolve the plastic in question. A "N" indicates that the solvent is not recommended for use with that plastic. Either it does not dissolve the plastic at all or does so poorly.

Polymethyl methacrylate (Acrylic)
- 1,2 Dichloroethane: Y
- Acetone: Y
- Cyclohexanone: Y
- Dichloromethane: Y
- MEK: Y
- Methyl benzene: Y
- Tetrahydrofuran: Y

Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS)
- 1,2 Dichloroethane: Y
- Acetone: Y
- Cyclohexanone: Y
- Dichloromethane: N
- MEK: Y
- Methyl benzene: N
- Tetrahydrofuran: N

Polyacetal (Delrin - POM)
- 1,2 Dichloroethane: N
- Acetone: N
- Cyclohexanone: N
- Dichloromethane: N
- MEK: Y
- Methyl benzene: Y
- Tetrahydrofuran: N

Cellulose acetate butyrate (Butyrate)
- 1,2 Dichloroethane: Y
- Acetone: Y
- Cyclohexanone: Y
- Dichloromethane: Y
- MEK: Y
- Methyl benzene: Y
- Tetrahydrofuran: Y

Cross-linked low density polyethylene (PEX)
- 1,2 Dichloroethane: Y
- Acetone: Y (at 100%)
- Cyclohexanone: N
- Dichloromethane: Y
- MEK: N
- Methyl benzene: Y
- Tetrahydrofuran: Y

Low density polyethylene (LDPE)
- 1,2 Dichloroethane: Y
- Acetone: Y
- Cyclohexanone: Y
- Dichloromethane: Y
- MEK: Y
- Methyl benzene: N
- Tetrahydrofuran: N

High density polyethylene (HDPE)
- 1,2 Dichloroethane: Y
- Acetone: Y
- Cyclohexanone: N
- Dichloromethane: N
- MEK: Y
- Methyl benzene: Y
- Tetrahydrofuran: N

Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW)
- 1,2 Dichloroethane: N
- Acetone: N
- Cyclohexanone: N
- Dichloromethane: Y
- MEK: N
- Methyl benzene: Y
- Tetrahydrofuran: N

Nylon
- 1,2 Dichloroethane: N
- Acetone: N
- Cyclohexanone: N
- Dichloromethane: N
- MEK: N
- Methyl benzene: N
- Tetrahydrofuran: N

Polycarbonate
- 1,2 Dichloroethane: Y
- Acetone: Y
- Cyclohexanone: Y
- Dichloromethane: Y
- MEK: Y
- Methyl benzene: Y
- Tetrahydrofuran: Y

Polyester (Polyethylene terephthalate - PET)
- 1,2 Dichloroethane: Y
- Acetone: Y
- Cyclohexanone: N
- Dichloromethane: Y
- MEK: N
- Methyl benzene: N
- Tetrahydrofuran: Y

Copolyester (Polyethylene terephthalate glycol - PETG)
- 1,2 Dichloroethane: Y
- Acetone: Y
- Cyclohexanone: Y
- Dichloromethane: Y
- MEK: Y
- Methyl benzene: Y
- Tetrahydrofuran: Y

Polypropylene
- 1,2 Dichloroethane: Y
- Acetone: Y
- Cyclohexanone: N
- Dichloromethane: Y
- MEK: N
- Methyl benzene: Y
- Tetrahydrofuran: N

Polystyrene
- 1,2 Dichloroethane: Y
- Acetone: Y
- Cyclohexanone: Y
- Dichloromethane: Y
- MEK: Y
- Methyl benzene: Y
- Tetrahydrofuran: Y

Polyvinyl chloride (PVC)*
- 1,2 Dichloroethane: Y
- Acetone: Y
- Cyclohexanone: Y
- Dichloromethane: Y
- MEK: Y
- Methyl benzene: Y
- Tetrahydrofuran: Y
*Includes PVC in pipe and flexible tube, as well as CPVC as we use it, since our CPVC is simply Copper-sized PVC and not Chlorinated PVC.

Teflon (TFE)
- 1,2 Dichloroethane: N
- Acetone: N
- Cyclohexanone: N
- Dichloromethane: N
- MEK: N
- Methyl benzene: N
- Tetrahydrofuran: N

On solvents

1,2 Dichloroethane: Also known as Ethylene dichloride. Found in paint removers.
Acetone: Found in small quantities in nail polish remover. Also found in various plastic cements. Also found in acrylic paint thinners and varnishes. Can be bought pure.
Cyclohexanone: Found in plastic cement, particularly ABS and PVC pipe cement.
Dichloromethane: Also known as Methylene chloride. Found primarily in paint stripper. Used as an industrial solvent. Banned in Europe.
Methyl ethyl ketone (MEK): Also known as Butanone. A large component of almost all plastic cements especially ABS and polystyrene cement. Can be bought pure.
Methyl benzene: Also known as Toluene. Used mostly as a paint thinner or paint remover. Found along with MEK in polystyrene model kit cement.
Tetrahydrofuran: Found almost exclusively in PVC cement. Can also be in some varnishes.

Plastic cement is generally comprised of a solvent (or mixture of solvents) along with dissolve plastic resin of the plastic in question. Thus PVC cement will contain dissolved PVC along with the solvents.
Examples:
Genova ABS cement is around 20% Acetone, 60% MEK, and 20% ABS resin.
Oatey Green Transition cement is around 40% Tetrahydrofuran, 35% Acetone and MEK, 10% Cyclohexanone, and 15% PVC resin.
Look either on the can or search for Material Safety Data Sheets for the ingredients and quantities, and then look up which plastics these will work with.
 

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Thanks for starting this Andy.

I just got some "Magic Sculpt" 2 part epoxy clay to use to try to finish off a door panel. I have the lower 80% of the door covered with a one piece 3/4" baffle of MDF (coated for water proofing). The bottom foot is 2 layers so 1.5" thick baffle. The Dyn MW170 is mounted to this baffle and now I need to finish off the panel. Of course the panel had to be cut in some places as it would not clear the baffle in the corner. But the panel fit over the baffle that covers almost the entire door. And all worthwhile as with that huge baffle I hardly need subs (that said for effect, you always need a sub!-lol).

So I'm trying"
1) to fill in the odd space between the panel and the baffle so that no sound gets "under" the door panel and
2) to build up the "outside" of the panel and integrate a grill.

Ideas happily accepted.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks for starting this Andy.

I just got some "Magic Sculpt" 2 part epoxy clay to use to try to finish off a door panel. I have the lower 80% of the door covered with a one piece 3/4" baffle of MDF (coated for water proofing). The bottom foot is 2 layers so 1.5" thick baffle. The Dyn MW170 is mounted to this baffle and now I need to finish off the panel. Of course the panel had to be cut in some places as it would not clear the baffle in the corner. But the panel fit over the baffle that covers almost the entire door. And all worthwhile as with that huge baffle I hardly need subs (that said for effect, you always need a sub!-lol).

So I'm trying"
1) to fill in the odd space between the panel and the baffle so that no sound gets "under" the door panel and
2) to build up the "outside" of the panel and integrate a grill.


Ideas happily accepted.
if i were you - i would forego trying to build it back up with plastic components. i would make a facia cover out of fiberglass. heck - you could get some 2-part foam from uscomposites.com and tape off the speaker and the door really well, and apply the foam to the tape and shape it to the desired look- then put a layer of fiberglass over the top of that. sand it trim it fill it and have a beauty panel that covers the speaker that attaches to the door panel itself.

thats how i would do it. what i am trying to do with this thread is come up with solutions to fixing or fabricating out of plastics using glues\solvents\melting techniques to keep the materials the same so that they never crack\flake\warp. things like head unit bezels and such. i think the materials cost for building up a door panel like you have would be cost prohibitive - as an 8 ounce tube of plastic repair from 3M is like #40
 

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